Category Archives: Estate Planning

Health Care Decisions and Advance Medical Directives Webcast

Trust Attorney Woodland HillsEstate Planning Attorney KC Marie Knox was invited by the National Business Institute (NBI) to serve as a faculty member for their Elder Law: Start to Finish seminar. The Health Care Decisions and Advance Medical Directives Webcast will take place on September 7, 2016 and will cover:

  1. Advance Directives
  2. End of Life Decisions
  3. Organ Donation and Treatment of the Remains

This legal course is designed for attorneys. It will also benefit nursing home administrators, financial planners, trust officers, accountants, social workers, geriatric care managers, and other professionals working with elder clients on estate planning issues.

About Woodland Hills Estate Planning Attorney KC Marie Knox:

Estate Planning Attorney Woodland Hills Continue reading

It’s Official – 2016 Estate and Gift Tax Exemption Increased!

Estate Planning Woodland HillsIt’s official — for 2016, the estate and gift tax exemption is $5.45 million per individual, up from $5.43 million in 2015.

That means an individual can leave $5.45 million to heirs and pay no federal estate or gift tax. A married couple will be able to shield $10.9 million from federal estate and gift taxes.

The annual gift exclusion remains the same at $14,000.

For more information about estate planning, please contact our Estate Planning Attorney in Woodland Hills today: (818) 501-5800

What Happens to Reward Points When You Die?

Reward PointsTom was fairly successful in life and had a love for travel.  To maximize his options, Tom was enrolled in several different programs which generated reward points.  These points could then be redeemed for travel, hotel stays, car rentals, etc.  Tom assumed that when he passed away, his accumulation of reward points would simply pass on to his kids, or whomever else he designated as part of his estate plan.  Despite Tom’s intended plan, the reward programs had a different plan in mind.

Tom was enrolled in three specific reward programs, each of which was linked to a specific credit card:

  1. Citi/Aadvantage
  2. American Express
  3. Chase Marriott Rewards

Continue reading

Don’t Leave Your Fiduciaries Floundering (Part 2)

Estate Planning Attorney Woodland HillsContinuing from Part 1, here are 2 more suggestions you can do to make the task of being a fiduciary easier:

  1. Digital Assets. As e-commerce and money transfers become more common, consider adding a second called “Digital Assets” and include the following:
    1. Online only accounts like PayPal
    2. Accounts which you have opted to access online, such as banking accounts, online businesses or activities involving the electronic transfer of funds.

It would also be of assistance to leave your online account information and passwords in a secure location that your legal representatives can access — bearing in mind the need to Continue reading

Don’t Leave Your Fiduciaries Floundering (Part 1)

Estate Planning Attorney Woodland HillsThe task of a fiduciary (e.g. executor, trustee or attorney in fact), when you are no longer around or able to provide guidance, can be a difficult one. He or she is charged with the job of gathering/marshalling all your assets. Effectively he or she is taking your place when you are unable to act or are no longer with us. To make that task easier, there are a number of things you can do. Here are some suggestions:

  1. Non-Legal Records. There are documents, in addition to the legal ones, that may also assist your legal representative. Consider adding a section called “Records” and include the following:
    1. Any information on pre-paid funeral or cemetery arrangements;
    2. A list of valuable assets (such as stocks/bonds, artwork, jewelry, collectibles) and their location (such as closet safe, freezer, lockbox under bed);
    3. Deeds for real estate holdings (residential, commercial or timeshares) with copies of related insurance policies;
    4. Continue reading

IRS Raises Limit on Tax-Free Transfers

Estate Planning Woodland HillsAs many estate planners anticipated, The Internal Revenue Service has raised the limit on tax-free transfers during life or at death.  Beginning in 2015 that amount, known as the basic exclusion, will increase to $5.43 million per person, up from $5.34 million this year.  This announcement, in Revenue Procedure 2014-61, indicates there will be no change in the annual exclusion, allowing you to give $14,000 in cash or other assets each year to as many individuals as you want without using the basic exclusion. The annual exclusion gifts don’t count towards the lifetime gift exemption. Another tactic is to fund a Continue reading

Do You Still Need an Estate Plan if You are Not Wealthy? (Part 2)

Estate-Planning Lawyer Los AngelesContinuing on our estate tax discussion from last month, there are a number of other reasons, besides minimizing estate tax, to consider whether to engage the services of an estate planning attorney:

  • Without an estate plan, the State determines what happens to your property when you die.
  • Without an estate plan, and in particular a trust, the transfer of your estate will require a probate except in the limited circumstance of what is referred to as a “small estate”.  The probate process can be expensive and time consuming.  For example, an estate of $2 million, well under the 2012 $5.12 million threshold in the IRS study, would incur attorneys’ fees set by statute of approximately $40,000.00.
  • Without an estate plan (which would typically include powers of attorney and healthcare directives), should you become ill or incapacitated, your loved ones could not easily step in to take care of health and/other decisions and needs.

So the next time the question of an estate plan comes up and you think to yourself, I have “nothing”, I do not need a plan, do yourself a favor and reconsider.

Do You Still Need an Estate Plan if You are Not Wealthy? (Part 1)

Estate Tax Returns Filed and Total Net Estate Tax, 2003–2012

Source: IRS, Statistics of Income, August 2013

The IRS recently released a statistical report entitled “Estate Tax Returns filed for Wealthy Decedents, 2003-2012”.  Some of the more interesting statistics in the data collected were:

  • The number of estate tax returns declined 87 percent from about 73,100 in 2003 to about 9,400 in 2012 primarily due to the gradual increase in the filing threshold.
  • The gross estate filing threshold was $5.12 million in 2012, up from $1.0 million in 2003.
  • In 2012, the total net estate tax reported on all estate tax returns filed for the year was $8.5 billion.
  • California had the highest number of estate tax returns filed in 2012, followed by Florida, New York, Texas, and Illinois.
  • Estate tax decedents with total assets of $20 million or more held a greater share of their portfolio in stocks (about 40 percent) and lesser shares in real estate and retirement assets than decedents in other total asset categories

Does the significant decline in the number of estate tax returns (due to the threshold for such returns increasing to $5.12 million in 2012 from $1 million) mean that only the “wealthy” (i.e. those with estates in excess of $5.12 million based on the 2012 threshold), need to be concerned about an estate plan and the avoidance or minimization of estate taxes?  Absolutely not.

While the avoidance and/or minimization of estate taxes is certainly one good reason to engage the services of an estate planning attorney, there are a number of other reasons to consider which will be discussed in part 2 of this blog series.